Outlooks - Heather Hart Storm King Art Center
  • Heather Hart at the Storm King Art Center thumb
  • Heather Hart at the Storm King Art Center thumb
  • Heather Hart at the Storm King Art Center thumb
  • Heather Hart at the Storm King Art Center thumb
  • Heather Hart at the Storm King Art Center thumb
  • Heather Hart at the Storm King Art Center thumb
  • Heather Hart at the Storm King Art Center thumb
  • Heather Hart at the Storm King Art Center thumb
  • Heather Hart at the Storm King Art Center thumb
  • Heather Hart at the Storm King Art Center thumb
  • Heather Hart at the Storm King Art Center thumb
  • Heather Hart at the Storm King Art Center thumb
  • Heather Hart at the Storm King Art Center thumb
  • Heather Hart at the Storm King Art Center thumb
  • Heather Hart at the Storm King Art Center thumb
  • Heather Hart at the Storm King Art Center thumb
  • Heather Hart at the Storm King Art Center thumb

MAY 13 – NOVEMBER 12, 2017


Outlooks: Heather Hart comprises an interactive sculptural environment in the form of a domestic rooftop—a space that, in collaboration with community partners, is repeatedly enlivened by music, workshops, movement, spoken word and poetry, and other events. Hart has titled this work The Oracle of Lacuna in reference to the gaps present in official, written histories of the Hudson Valley region—gaps that individuals fill and refill with interpretations and translations originating from personal experiences, as well as fantasies. As Hart has said, “The narratives of The Oracle of Lacuna are meant to emerge and transform through public programming and viewer activation. I am interested not only in creating a site-specific liminal space for personal reclamation but also in unpacking dominant narratives and creating alternatives to them.”


Hart is inspired by storytelling traditions, ideas of home, and narratives that add to, or even contradict, official written history. The roof is a recurring form in her work: it is a space between the earth and sky, between shelter and danger, between private and public. The rooftop carries a personal resonance for the artist as well—her father was a carpenter, and she also remembers as a child using her home’s own rooftop as a personal sanctuary. Hart sees carpentry as related to oral history in that it is a trade without official training, passed down from one person to another. Through the continued activation of the site she hopes to address oral histories and the slippage of meaning within them: when one person tells a story, the listener perceives something slightly different from what was originally told.


In the months leading up to this project, Hart connected with local historians, artists, and residents to learn more about how regional histories of slavery, migration, and growth have shaped local communities. Underneath the rooftop, in the “attic” space that the roof creates, roundtables organized and recorded by Hart in spring 2017 trace intersecting histories of Storm King’s region. Topics include the founding and history of Storm King itself, personal accounts of people of the African Diaspora migrating to and living in Storm King’s region, and the histories of displacement and change within local Native American communities.


Visitors are permitted to walk atop and underneath Hart’s sculpture.


Outlooks, now in its fifth year, is an exhibition series that invites one emerging or mid-career artist to engage with Storm King’s landscape and history and create a new, site-specific work to be installed on-site for a single season.


Outlooks: Heather Hart is made possible by generous lead support from the Samuel Freeman Charitable Trust. Additional support is also provided by VIA Art Fund and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

Support for education-related programming is provided by Agnes Gund and the Sidney E. Frank Foundation. Artist talks are made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

Organized by Nora Lawrence, Curator, Storm King Art Center.